Categories
Poetry

Surprised by Joy BY WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

Surprised by joy—impatient as the Wind
I turned to share the transport—Oh! with whom
But Thee, long buried in the silent Tomb,
That spot which no vicissitude can find?
Love, faithful love, recalled thee to my mind—
But how could I forget thee?—Through what power,
Even for the least division of an hour,
Have I been so beguiled as to be blind
To my most grievous loss!—That thought’s return
Was the worst pang that sorrow ever bore,
Save one, one only, when I stood forlorn,
Knowing my heart’s best treasure was no more;
That neither present time, nor years unborn
Could to my sight that heavenly face restore.

Categories
Poetry

I Travelled among Unknown Men BY WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

I travelled among unknown men, 
In lands beyond the sea; 
Nor, England! did I know till then 
What love I bore to thee. 

‘Tis past, that melancholy dream! 
Nor will I quit thy shore 
A second time; for still I seem 
To love thee more and more. 

Among thy mountains did I feel 
The joy of my desire; 
And she I cherished turned her wheel 
Beside an English fire. 

Thy mornings showed, thy nights concealed, 
The bowers where Lucy played; 
And thine too is the last green field 
That Lucy’s eyes surveyed. 

Categories
Poetry

The World Is Too Much With Us William Wordsworth

The world is too much with us; late and soon,
Getting and spending, we lay waste our powers;
Little we see in Nature that is ours;
We have given our hearts away, a sordid boon!
This Sea that bares her bosom to the moon;
The winds that will be howling at all hours,
And are up-gathered now like sleeping flowers,
For this, for everything, we are out of tune;
It moves us not.—Great God! I’d rather be
A pagan suckled in a creed outworn;
So might I, standing on this pleasant lea,
Have glimpses that would make me less forlorn;
Have sight of Proteus rising from the sea;
Or hear old Triton blow his wreathèd horn.

William Wordsworth, 1770 – 1850

Categories
Poetry

Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood BY WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

There was a time when meadow, grove, and stream,
The earth, and every common sight,
To me did seem
Apparelled in celestial light,
The glory and the freshness of a dream.
It is not now as it hath been of yore;—
Turn wheresoe’er I may,
By night or day.
The things which I have seen I now can see no more.
The Rainbow comes and goes,
And lovely is the Rose,
The Moon doth with delight
Look round her when the heavens are bare,
Waters on a starry night
Are beautiful and fair;
The sunshine is a glorious birth;
But yet I know, where’er I go,
That there hath past away a glory from the earth.
Categories
Poetry

Elegiac Stanzas by William Wordsworth

Elegiac Stanzas Suggested by a Picture of Peele Castle in a Storm, Painted by Sir George Beaumont

BY WILLIAM WORDSWORTH
I was thy neighbour once, thou rugged Pile!
Four summer weeks I dwelt in sight of thee:
I saw thee every day; and all the while
Thy Form was sleeping on a glassy sea.
So pure the sky, so quiet was the air!
So like, so very like, was day to day!
Whene’er I looked, thy Image still was there;
It trembled, but it never passed away.
Categories
Poetry

The Sailor’s Mother * William Wordsworth Poem

Josef Rippl Ronai - Woman with a bird cage 1892
Josef Rippl Ronai – Woman with a bird cage 1892

ONE morning (raw it was and wet–
A foggy day in winter time)
A Woman on the road I met,
Not old, though something past her prime:
Majestic in her person, tall and straight;
And like a Roman matron’s was her mien and gait.

Categories
Poetry

November, 1806 *WILLIAM WORDSWORTH

Another year!—another deadly blow!
Another mighty Empire overthrown!
And We are left, or shall be left, alone;
The last that dare to struggle with the Foe.
‘Tis well! from this day forward we shall know
That in ourselves our safety must be sought;
That by our own right hands it must be wrought;
That we must stand unpropped, or be laid low.
O dastard whom such foretaste doth not cheer!
We shall exult, if they who rule the land
Be men who hold its many blessings dear,
Wise, upright, valiant; not a servile band,
Who are to judge of danger which they fear,
And honour which they do not understand.
Notes:1-2] Prussia was overthrown by Napoleon’s victory at Jena, October 14, 1806.

10-14] if they who rule the land …. Pitt had died in January 1806 and Fox in September. Lord Grenville succeeded Pitt as Prime Minister.

Categories
Poetry

Foresight by William Wordsworth – Poetry

 THAT is work of waste and ruin--
          Do as Charles and I are doing!
          Strawberry-blossoms, one and all,
          We must spare them--here are many:
          Look at it--the flower is small,
          Small and low, though fair as any:
          Do not touch it! summers two
          I am older, Anne, than you.