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The SIX – Mark Alpert

If you’re looking for your next techie/sci-fi YA book fix, you’ve found your ideal match.  In short, The Six is about a group of terminally ill teenagers whose lives are “saved” when their minds are downloaded to combat-ready U.S. Army robots. The seventeen-year-old hero, Adam Armstrong, becomes the first human-machine hybrid — a hulking robot called a Pioneer — when his computer-scientist father scans Adam’s brain in such detail that all his memories and personality traits can be transferred to electronic circuits.

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Margaret Atwood – The Heart Goes Last or the story of the robot Elvis sex toy and the sex chicken

I’ve read I’m starved for you nearly three years ago and I managed to find another book from the Positron Series a month back. It was such a hassle to read and I could not place my finger on why. I kept on picking up the book and then putting it back down. The characters did not resonate at all with me and were mostly distasteful.
Towards the end, the story does pick up a little and there are some interesting side-stories, but nothing to do with the main plot line.

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Only Human (Themis Files #3) by Sylvain Neuvel

I really loved Sleeping Giants and Walking Gods from the Themis Files trilogy by Sylvain Neuvel.

http_%2F%2Fwww.unboundworlds.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2017%2F10%2FIMG-0097.jpgSylvain Neuvel was asked during an interview where his ideas of mecha robots came from and he mentioned it originated from a series of questions his son started asking when he was offered a robot as a toy.

What kind of robot? What does it do? Does it have lasers? Does it fly? Who built it? I started thinking about a backstory for a toy, and that’s how Sleeping Giants was born.

I eventually built the toy. The concept was cool: It came in pieces all together with magnets. You could take the pieces off and put it together like they do in the book. The finished product was find for about a day, and the magnets started breaking off. That was more of a statue than anything, but my kid still likes it.

Only Human was released in May 1st 2018, and it brings up the Themis files to a very satisfying end. We have even more aliens, more robots and more betrayals. I cried about three times throughout – once when I thought that Mr. Burns died along with his family, once when I thought Vincent died and once more when I thought both Vincent and Eva died. Mr. Neuvel – don’t play these games with me! I was shocked enough during book 2!

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Waking Gods (Themis Files #2) by Sylvain Neuvel

Every single person on Earth—well, 99.95 percent of them—has alien genetics.

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Sleeping Giants (Themis Files #1) by Sylvain Neuvel

If you fall in love with someone, there’s a good chance the person won’t love you back. Hatred, though, is usually mutual. If you despise someone, it’s pretty much a given they’re also not your biggest fan.

Well, I fell in love with this book. It started off slow but then it grabbed me in a whirlpool and I could not escape. It’s got everything a true sci-fi fan will love! Massive mecha robots, buried secrets from an ancient and possible alien civilisation, science and military battles between countries. It’s an unusal book in the sense that it’s been written as a series of reports and interviews numbered ascending but with missing pieces. The most important pieces at least.

It all starts with an US Government project that uncovers a piece of a foot buried deep underground which reacts to iridium – a very rare heavy metal. Using this, they identify a hand with long slender fingers, legs, arms, a torso and eventually a head. All the pieces form a huge (gigantic actually) figure of a female warrior armed with a shield and sword. They call her Themis.

Themis was one of the Titans, daughter of Uranus and Gaea. She was the human-like representation of the natural and moral order. The name derives from the Greek word meaning that which is current and contemporary. According to Hesiod, she was the second wife of Zeus, a marriage that helped the supreme Olympian to stabilise his power over all gods and humans.

https_%2F%2Fjourneyingtothegoddess.files.wordpress.com%2F2012%2F08%2Firislibra300.jpgThemis also represents the law and undisputed order, the divine right. She was the goddess that created the divine laws that govern everything and are even above gods themselves. In general, Themis had three subsistences; goddess of natural order, which manifested through the Hores (the Hours), meaning the seasonal and never-ceasing rotation of time; goddess of moral order, manifested through Eunomia (fair order), Deke (trial) and Erene (peace), which were the utmost characteristics of the society, and through the Moires, which represented the destiny of every human being; and finally, goddess of prophecy, shown through the Nymphs, as well as the virgin Astraea.

Source: https://www.greekmythology.com/Titans/Themis/themis.html

 

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I, Robot * Isaac Asimov (1950)

I can bet any amount that you’ve seen the Will Smith Movie I, Robot. That was the single reason I did not pick up this book earlier – simply because I mistakenly thought that the movie would be like Harry Potter, a scene-for scene rendering of a classic. I was very much mistaken as the movie was loosely inspired on the book and had elements from several stories, all of them exemplifying the laws of robotics:

1) A robot may not injure a human being or, through inaction, allow a human being to come to harm.
2) A robot must obey orders given to it by human beings except where such orders would conflict with the First Law.
3) A robot must protect its own existence as long as such protection does not conflict with the First or Second Law.

Robot_Wallpaper_1

The collection of stories in this book is created to showcase both the early origins of robot development to the later stages where robots entered a conflicted state where two or more of the rules clash or where one rule is missing from the get-up. Here are stories of robots gone mad, of mind-read robots, and robots with a sense of humor. Of robot politicians, and robots who secretly run the world–all told with the dramatic blend of science fact and science fiction that has become Asimov’s trademark.