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Book Reviews

Ragnar Lothbrok and a History of the Vikings – Noah Brown

After the huge success of the TV show from History Channel, there were a series of people wanting to take advantage of the fame and glory. There were “Norsemen” – the parody TV show and then there was Noah Brown who took all the main cast of characters and went through their lives (not always in chronological order).

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Book Reviews

Only Human (Themis Files #3) by Sylvain Neuvel

I really loved Sleeping Giants and Walking Gods from the Themis Files trilogy by Sylvain Neuvel.

http_%2F%2Fwww.unboundworlds.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2F2017%2F10%2FIMG-0097.jpgSylvain Neuvel was asked during an interview where his ideas of mecha robots came from and he mentioned it originated from a series of questions his son started asking when he was offered a robot as a toy.

What kind of robot? What does it do? Does it have lasers? Does it fly? Who built it? I started thinking about a backstory for a toy, and that’s how Sleeping Giants was born.

I eventually built the toy. The concept was cool: It came in pieces all together with magnets. You could take the pieces off and put it together like they do in the book. The finished product was find for about a day, and the magnets started breaking off. That was more of a statue than anything, but my kid still likes it.

Only Human was released in May 1st 2018, and it brings up the Themis files to a very satisfying end. We have even more aliens, more robots and more betrayals. I cried about three times throughout – once when I thought that Mr. Burns died along with his family, once when I thought Vincent died and once more when I thought both Vincent and Eva died. Mr. Neuvel – don’t play these games with me! I was shocked enough during book 2!

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Dean Koontz

Dean Koontz * The Taking Book Review

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In one of the most dazzling books of his celebrated career, Dean Koontz delivers a masterwork of page-turning suspense that surpasses even his own inimitable reputation as a chronicler of our worst fears—and best dreams. In THE TAKING he tells the story of a community cut off from a world under siege, and the terrifying battle for survival waged by a young couple and their neighbors as familiar streets become fog-shrouded death traps. Gripping, heartbreaking, and triumphant in the face of mankind’s darkest hour, here is a small-town slice-of-doomsday thriller that strikes to the core of each of us to ask: What would you do in the midst of THE TAKING.

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Book Reviews

The War of the Worlds * H.G. Wells

Every passing decade, the culture of human beings as a whole has been significantly affected by technology and science. Whether it’s something small, like the invention of automatic doors, or something enormously important, like the invention of the telegraph or the discovery of DNA, technology and science change the way we live, and how we view life, all the time.

Generally these inventions and discoveries are considered “good;” they are making life easier for us and helping us better our understanding of both ourselves and the world around us. However, to some, science has challenged their way of life. Instead of embracing new perspectives, some religious followers have tended to cling to traditional beliefs and shun what science and technology have to offer. For instance, when Charles Darwin introduced his theory of evolution by natural selection, he was directly challenging the cardinal belief that God created the earth and its inhabitants. Traditional religious believers became outraged because Darwin and fellow biologists were claiming, with hard evidence, that everything they believed in was completely false. A century and a half later, ideas pertaining to evolution and religion are still mutually exclusive for many involved in the argument.

With this being said, there is no correct way of thinking. Not one person truly knows why we’re here on earth, and it’s very unlikely that any sort of science or religion will ever tell us the reason. These belief systems are simply attempts on our part to do all we can to understand. However, H.G. Wells’ novel, War of the Worlds, poses an interesting argument regarding this divide between science and religion.

“Now whenever things are so that a lot of people feel they ought to be doing something, the weak, and those who go weak with a lot of complicated thinking, always make for a sort of do-nothing religion, very pious and superior, and submit to persecution and the will of the Lord.”

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Book Reviews

The Host – Stephanie Meyer

Completely different from Twilight and offering a slightly better love story than Bella and Edward, The Host is a book about an alien species who call themselves “souls” who like to invade unsuspecting planets and attach themselves in the aboriginal life forms and live on their life spans. It’s a story about an invasion aftermath, about a wandering “soul” who could not fully exorcise the human conscience living inside its host body and who finds that the “monstrous” humans living on the planet were not as bad as described. It’s a story about another love triangle and being a book from Stephanie Meyer – it’s a boring love story.

The premise is good but the book is so drawn out and uselessly padded that I felt like stopping reading it a few times during the last 4 weeks (! this coming from the same person who devoured a similarly lengthy book in 2 days).

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