Categories
Book Reviews

A Head Full of Ghosts – Paul Tremblay Book Review

Other jackasses have tried to argue that it’s John Barrett, not Marjorie Barrett, who becomes The Possession ’s true tragic figure, and that the show is really about his descent into madness, his being possessed by the ugliness of hatred and zealotry. His daughter’s illness, his family’s dysfunction, his unemployed status, and his beloved Catholic church abandoning him post-exorcism, are the aforementioned catalysts to his own psychotic break (see the Howard Journal of Criminal Justice and their breakdown of the four types of men who kill their families), and blah, blah, blah. Fuck that bullshit.

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Dean Koontz

The Moonlit Mind: A Tale of Suspense – Dean Koontz

This city—perhaps any city—is a place of secrets and enigmas. Roaming alone with your dog in realms that others seldom visit, you will glimpse disturbing phenomena and strange presences that suggest the world has dimensions that reason alone cannot explain.

In this chilling original stand-alone novella, #1 New York Times bestselling author Dean Koontz offers a taste of what’s to come in 77 Shadow Street with a mesmerising tale of a homeless boy at large in a city fraught with threats . . . both human and otherwise.

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Book Reviews

Twisted – Andrew E. Kaufman Book Review

What a thrill this book has been! I started reading and I couldn’t put it down. It was like a book on anti-gravity. All jokes aside, this book is a hell of a roller-coaster. What is worse than losing your mind? Is knowing it’s happened before to one member of your family and knowing it’s now happening to you and now you are the one who presents a danger to others.

The plains of human suffering are slippery slopes. Every traveller is so frail and unsteady, vulnerable to even the slightest threat of doubt or uncertainty. The goal here is to change his emotional climate. To normalise the feelings he has about his past trauma so that he’s able to talk about them.

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Dean Koontz

The Neighbor – Dean Koontz Short Story

This lovely 30 page story is just a prequel to Dean Koontz’ much anticipated novel: The City. The year is 1967 and the trio that would unravel the mysteries in the second book are just twelve. Amalia and her brother Malcolm Pomerantz are living with their parents next to an abandoned house. Their lives are simple, filled with Jazz and not talking to their parents.

Categories
Poetry

“The Jumblies” by Edward Lear

I
They went to sea in a Sieve, they did,
   In a Sieve they went to sea:
In spite of all their friends could say,
On a winter’s morn, on a stormy day,
   In a Sieve they went to sea!
And when the Sieve turned round and round,
And every one cried, ‘You’ll all be drowned!’
They called aloud, ‘Our Sieve ain’t big,
But we don’t care a button! we don’t care a fig!
   In a Sieve we’ll go to sea!’
      Far and few, far and few,
         Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
      Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
         And they went to sea in a Sieve.
II
They sailed away in a Sieve, they did,
   In a Sieve they sailed so fast,
With only a beautiful pea-green veil
Tied with a riband by way of a sail,
   To a small tobacco-pipe mast;
And every one said, who saw them go,
‘O won’t they be soon upset, you know!
For the sky is dark, and the voyage is long,
And happen what may, it’s extremely wrong
   In a Sieve to sail so fast!’
      Far and few, far and few,
         Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
      Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
         And they went to sea in a Sieve.
III
The water it soon came in, it did,
   The water it soon came in;
So to keep them dry, they wrapped their feet
In a pinky paper all folded neat,
   And they fastened it down with a pin.
And they passed the night in a crockery-jar,
And each of them said, ‘How wise we are!
Though the sky be dark, and the voyage be long,
Yet we never can think we were rash or wrong,
   While round in our Sieve we spin!’
      Far and few, far and few,
         Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
      Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
         And they went to sea in a Sieve.
IV
And all night long they sailed away;
   And when the sun went down,
They whistled and warbled a moony song
To the echoing sound of a coppery gong,
   In the shade of the mountains brown.
‘O Timballo! How happy we are,
When we live in a sieve and a crockery-jar,
And all night long in the moonlight pale,
We sail away with a pea-green sail,
   In the shade of the mountains brown!’
      Far and few, far and few,
         Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
     Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
         And they went to sea in a Sieve.
V
They sailed to the Western Sea, they did,
   To a land all covered with trees,
And they bought an Owl, and a useful Cart,
And a pound of Rice, and a Cranberry Tart,
   And a hive of silvery Bees.
And they bought a Pig, and some green Jack-daws,
And a lovely Monkey with lollipop paws,
And forty bottles of Ring-Bo-Ree,
   And no end of Stilton Cheese.
      Far and few, far and few,
         Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
      Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
         And they went to sea in a Sieve.
VI
And in twenty years they all came back,
   In twenty years or more,
And every one said, ‘How tall they’ve grown!’
For they’ve been to the Lakes, and the Torrible Zone,
   And the hills of the Chankly Bore;
And they drank their health, and gave them a feast
Of dumplings made of beautiful yeast;
And everyone said, ‘If we only live,
We too will go to sea in a Sieve,—
   To the hills of the Chankly Bore!’
      Far and few, far and few,
         Are the lands where the Jumblies live;
      Their heads are green, and their hands are blue,
         And they went to sea in a Sieve.
Categories
Book Reviews

Kelsey Rae Dimberg-Girl in the Rearview Mirror

Finn Hunt is the nanny for 4 year old Amabel, the daughter of Philip and Marina Martin. Philip’s father is a senator in Arizona, and the hope is one day Philip will be able to slide in and take his seat once his father decides to step down. Despite being the hired help, Finn feels like she is a part of the family and gets caught up in their wealthy and glamorous world. She soon finds herself in the middle of something that could bring down this political first family. She also needs to worry about her own past suddenly resurfacing.

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Book Reviews

Zero G by Dan Wells Book Review

I had the book in my audiobook library and it came as a freebie so I had my expectations on low and under.

I was blown away with the acting, the smart way of introducing interesting concepts to children and for actually making you think for a while. If you’ve seen the movie “Passengers” with Chris Pratt and Jennifer Lawrence, the premise of this book is quite similar. A passenger wakes up from cryo sleep during a long-haul colonisation mission. The passenger is only a boy though and through his questions and explorations, we find out a few cool facts about space and also have the opportunity to embark in a good adventure.

Feel the excitement!

Length: 4 h 8 min

Categories
Book Reviews

The Memory Keeper’s Daughter – Kim Edwards

When I picked up the Reader’s Digest collections of stories, this is the one I really wanted to read, but I had to start with a crap one called “An Offer you can’t refuse”.

In the year 1964, a set of twin is born in the peaceful house of a country doctor and his young lovely wife. The delivery doctor recognised that the girl has Down Syndrome, and suggests that the child is given to a home as they have short lives and can suffer from heart defects.

Categories
Poetry

Rupi Kaur – Milk and Honey

“you were so afraid
of my voice
i decided to be
afraid of it too”

Categories
Book Reviews

Margaret Atwood – The Heart Goes Last or the story of the robot Elvis sex toy and the sex chicken

I’ve read I’m starved for you nearly three years ago and I managed to find another book from the Positron Series a month back. It was such a hassle to read and I could not place my finger on why. I kept on picking up the book and then putting it back down. The characters did not resonate at all with me and were mostly distasteful.
Towards the end, the story does pick up a little and there are some interesting side-stories, but nothing to do with the main plot line.