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Book Reviews

Morning Star by Pierce Brown (Book 3)

choice-winner.png“You and I keep looking for light in the darkness, expecting it to appear. But it already has.” I touch his shoulder. “We’re it, boyo. Broken and cracked and stupid as we are, we’re the light, and we’re spreading.”

I have been dreading reading this book. It’s a trilogy so it should be in three books that all the passion ends and all the games stop. I didn’t want to say goodbye to Darrow. I’ve come to love this character from Mars, a boy remodelled to look like the elite of a solar system. I don’t want to say goodbye to a man who reminded me so much of the Kingkiller. A man who can inspire and lead and move the masses. Thank you Mr. Brown. Thank you.

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The other thing that really stands out is the fact that the books are unpredictable without being irritating or disappointing. I’m pretty good at anticipating where a story is going to go, and these books constantly zigged when I expected them to zag. But (and this is a really important note) while the ziggs the book took were surprising, they were always sensible and fit smoothly into the overall narrative and world.

Patrick Rothfuss (the man! Writer of The Name of The Wind)

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Book Reviews

Golden Son by Pierce Brown (Book 2)

I loved Red Rising By Pierce Brown (Book 1) and as quick as I could I jumped on eBay and got book 2 & 3 of the trilogy. I was very excited to see that the amazing story of the Helldiver from Lycos on Mars is still flowing as swiftly and quickly as Book 1. I was telling the guys at work that I’ve never read such a book before: the characters are well defined, the interplanetary intrigues are worthy of Game of Thrones status and the war tales would make a German commander’s toes curl from excitement.

It’s not victory that makes a man. It’s his defeats.

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Book Reviews

Orson Scott Card * Empire Book Review

I was recommended this book because it deals with politics.

It was more a polemic than a novel, and its attempts to be non-biased were far outweighed by the moments of its blatant one side-ness. If you area a strong supporter of the right and think that our patriotic duty is to not question either the president or the military then you would like this book. If, on the other hand, you think that this country was founded by people that questioned the authority over them and that is what made it great, or if you think allowing those in power to act outside the bounds of checks and balances is a bad idea, or even if you think that dissenting ideas should not be presented as straw-man arguments than this book is not for you.

White-House-Down

Orson Scott Card is a master storyteller, who has earned millions of fans and reams of praise for his previous science fiction and fantasy works. Now he steps a little closer to the present day with this chilling look at a near future scenario of a new American Civil War.

“The problem with elections is that anybody who wants an office badly enough to run for it probably shouldn’t have it. And anybody who does not want an office badly enough to run for it probably shouldn’t have it, either. Government office should be received like a child’s Christmas present, with surprise and delight. Instead it is usually received like a diploma, an anticlimax that never seems worth the struggle to earn it.”

The American Empire has grown too fast, and the fault lines at home are stressed to the breaking point. The war of words between Right and Left has collapsed into a shooting war, though most people just want to be left alone.

“A good working definition of fanaticism is that you are so convinced of your views and policies that you are sure that anyone who opposed them must be either stupid and decieved or have some ulterior motive. We are today a nation where almost everyone in the public eye displays fanaticism with every utterance.”

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Excerpts

The truth about War – from Game of Thrones book 4

Poorly shod and poorly clad, they march away beneath his banners, ofttimes with no better arms than a sickle or a sharpened hoe, or a maul they made themselves by lashing a stone to a stick with strips of hide. Brothers march with brothers, sons with fathers, friends with friends. They’ve heard the songs and stories, so they go off with eager hearts, dreaming of the wonders they will see, of the wealth and glory they will win. War seems a fine adventure, the greatest most of them will ever know.

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Then they get a taste of battle.